Alligators Affected by Flushed Meth According to Police

Have you heard about those drug crazed alligators yet? If you’ve checked in on social media the past few days, odds are the answer is yes! The Loretto, Tennessee police department unintentionally started the buzz when after a local bust, they asked residents to refrain from flushing illicit drugs, specifically meth, or left over prescriptions down the toilet.

They put a crazy spin on things though when they mentioned the fact that if the contaminated water released from the sewage treatment plant made it far enough, they could create “meth-gators.” They had no idea their tongue- in-cheek comment would create such a stir.

The post went viral and images of ominous looking gators were popping up everywhere along with the story. The department has since clarified that the meth-gator was a joke. The focus of the post was to encourage residents to dispose of prescription drugs properly.

If you don’t know anyone who is destroying their life using meth, or seen someone “tweaking” in the quick store on the corner, or enraged to the point of violence over dropping a soda, you are fortunate, my friend. Trust me, we’re glad there are no alligators strung out on this stuff.

Meth heads

Methamphetamine is a highly addictive drug. The DEA (U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration) classified the drug as a Schedule 2 stimulant. That means its only legal to use it if you have a prescription. One that’s nonrefillable, by the way.

Although, Desoxyn is maufactured legally to use as a treatment for ADHD or obesity, it is rarely prescribed. The street drug, on the other hand, is often cooked up in fly-by- night “laboratories” using common household products.

The drug is everywhere.

Very effective at destruction

Methamphetamine naturally decreases the appetite so rapid weight loss can be a telltale sign that someone is using. The user experiences a burst of energy, yet feels they have an increased ability to focus on the task at hand. In reality, they may be forcing their body to perform beyond its ability. In addition, meth creates a sense of euphoria or extreme well-being.

The “crash” hits hard, however, and users often experience a physical or mental breakdown causing them to use again. The phrase “vicious cycle” applies. The risk of overdose is great.

Short-term effects

In addition to weight loss, users experience an increased heart rate and blood pressure. Nausea, disturbed sleep patterns, and bizarre, erratic, sometimes violent behavior are common.

Long-term effecs

Things just go down hill from here. Long-term effects include permanent damage to blood vessels in the heart and brain. High blood pressure becomes a fact of life. Severe tooth decay sets in as well.

The list continues, but you get the point.

It’s a sickness

Over 10,000 people died from a methamphetamine related drug overdose in 2017. That isn’t counting those that suffered congestive heart failure, a stroke, or any of the other medically related deaths this scourge on society caused.

Addiction is a serious illness. Sadly, many never recover from it. Drug addicts put the next fix above everything else. They loose their homes, their families, and, often, their lives.


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